TMI? Here is What To Do Right Now!!!

Posted by Bernie Reifkind on October 6, 2011

Assuming that you already know that TMI is an acronym for “Too Much Information” it’s time to get serious about eliminating the non essential “noise” in our life.

As employers and business owners we are constantly bombarded with “war stories” by our employees with both good news and sometimes bad news.  We receive complaints, we are questioned. 

We listen and listen and read emails and texts.  We return phone calls and spend time on conference calls. We read the news, watch TV, listen to commercials, listen to the radio.

TMI.

Is it easier in the digital age to take in all this information that we are constantly bombarded with? I’m not sure.

How we process and remember all the data and dialogue in our working lives is a daunting challenge.

An example.  I received a call from a client that wanted an update to an email that was forwarded to me 2 weeks ago and within the email was a very specific question.  I of course had to trace my steps and find the email and respond.  Not too difficult, because it was digitally recorded.

But what about a dialogue that took place 2 weeks ago?  Are we supposed to remember every dialogue and response that we utter?  I can not even remember what I had for lunch yesterday.

Then of course there is the bombardment of the national and world news on the web and TV and radio-CNN, ABC, CBS, etc.  discussing the pressing matters of the moment.  Come on, we are all reading this stuff at least at some point during the day.  There is too much news.

Most importantly is of course the information that we receive from our family.  We of course want to know what is going on in our loved one’s lives and so we listen.  And listen, and listen.

TMI!!!!

Is there a reasonable solution? Yes of course. 

The solution is to be vigilantly aware of incoming information and to make an immediate  firm decision if your life situation will profit by this information.

Here are 5 things to do right now to limit TMI:

1.  When you are asked if you have a few minutes to talk:  pause and be honest with yourself if you can really spare the time to take on new information.  If your boss needs to speak with you well then of course the answer is yes.  But there are many times when NO is the best answer.

2.  Take a news vacation break: When you turn on your computer, make your browser appear as a blank page.  Ask a tekkie to help you if you are unable to do this your self.  You do not have to see Yahoo or CNN or MSNBC, etc. when you use the Internet.  The world won’t end if you are not plugged into the news for a week.  You know this is true.

3.  Hide :  Most of us feel that we are so damn important and that we need to be available to everyone all the time.  Maybe once in a while making yourself a little scarce is a good thing.  If you are able to close your door, then do it.  Be creative and go missing for a little while.  Your soul will benefit and everything will still be there when you get back.

4.  At home, turn off the TV, put down the book you are reading and simply “veg.”  Take in the silence and rest your mind.  “Veg out”, do nothing, lay down, go for a walk and seek quiet.  When you are driving, try turning off the radio.  Silence can be extremely therapeautic.  Try seeking silence and you may even sleep better.

5.  Limit checking your email:  Checking email is a hard habit to break, but in reality if you need to be reached, you can be found.  When you check your business email, typically it is a demand or a request, a justification or some type of action that you need to take.  TMI.  It can wait.

In summary, TMI is draining to the soul and the fact is that we are in complete control of 90% of the news we take in.  Your loved ones come first but after that, it is essential to limit the amount of noise that we have to process during a 24 hour period.

Give yourself a break.

I am Bernie Reifkind, CEO and founder of Premier Search, Inc.  I can be reached at 1(800) 801-1400 or email at ceo@psihealth.com.  I welcome your phone call.

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